Art project set to make environmental waves

St James Church of England First School took part in a Big Art Project run by Peter Marjoram with fellow Heath Academy Trust schools.

St James Church of England First School took part in a Big Art Project run by Peter Marjoram with fellow Heath Academy Trust schools.

Children across Dorset schools are making a real splash to highlight the damage plastic is causing the oceans.

Youngsters from Heath Academy Trust’s six first and primary schools are embarking on an ambitious art project to turn plastic washed up on local beaches into sculpture for a special art exhibition.

They are being supported by local artist Peter Marjoram, who has collected the plastic from Chesil Beach and the Fleet in Weymouth.

The children also brought in their own waste plastics, including juice and milk bottles, caps, yoghurt pots and plastic bags, which are a huge source of problems in the sea.

One of the first schools to get the project underway was St James’ CE First School in Alderholt. Headteacher, Jo Hudson, said: “With Peter’s guidance the children made sea creatures out of the plastic that has been found on our beaches and in the home.

“Our main theme throughout this project is to look at how we can reduce plastic waste so it is not ending up in our oceans.

“The plastic sea creatures we have been making symbolise the wildlife that needs protecting from our own rubbish.”

The children worked on joint creatures using a variety of hand tools such as drills and nuts and bolts to make permanent structure.

More plastic sculptures made by children from the other Heath Academy Trust schools – St Ives Primary, Three Legged Cross First, St Mary’s and Oakhurst first schools in West Moors and Sixpenny Handley First will eventually be added to the final exhibition.

The children’s creations will then form the centrepiece of an art exhibition, which will be held on June 29 at Chalbury and Holt Village Hall.

Heath Academy Trust CEO, Justine Horn, said: “This is a wonderful collaboration between our schools and is a powerful way of demonstrating to our children the harm plastic is doing to our oceans.

“This art project also shows what good can be made from plastic when it is re-used rather than thrown away.

“We cannot wait to share the final sculpture with our local community in the summer, it promises to look fantastic.”

 

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