Pupils put their art into helping the environment

Pupils put their art into helping the environment

Heath Academy Trust schools displayed their Big Art Project made from recycled materials at Chalbury and Horton Village Hall. St James, Three Legged Cross, St Ives, St Mary’s, Sixpenny Handley and Oakhyrst First Schools contributed to the display.

More than 900 children put their art and soul into helping the environment when they created an exhibition of recycled sculptures.

The youngsters from Heath Academy Trust’s six first and primary schools displayed their magnificent creations – all made from recycled plastic – at a special art exhibition.

This display, staged at Horton and Chalbury Village Hall, was the culmination of a year-long project in which the pupils have been learning about the importance of recycling and re-use.

During the year the children have enjoyed a visit from the Dorset Waste Partnership team, learned about the environmental impact of plastic on seas and beaches, taken part in beach cleans and visited a sculpture park for inspiration.

They also spent time with local artist, Peter Margerum, to create their sculptures out of plastic that was either recovered from Dorset beaches or re-used from their own homes.

Pupils put their art into helping the environment

Heath Academy Trust schools displayed their Big Art Project made from recycled materials at Chalbury and Horton Village Hall. St James, Three Legged Cross, St Ives, St Mary’s, Sixpenny Handley and Oakhyrst First Schools contributed to the display.

CEO of Heath Academy Trust, Justine Horn, said: “This has been a fantastic project that has brought all our schools together.

“The exhibition made a huge visual impact on how plastic does not have to be thrown away and cause damage to the planet.

“We were delighted to see so many parents, governors, trustees and members of the public come and see the results of the children’s hard work.”

During the project each HAT school focused on a different area around recycling to help create their sculptures.

St James First School in Alderholt focussed on using plastic to make sculptures of the class animal and St Mary’s First School and Nursery in West Moors re-created the birds their classes are named after.

Meanwhile St Ives Primary and Nursery School designed and made clothes and hats and used recycled bricks to make a sculpture.

The children at Oakhurst Community First and Nursery School in West Moors undertook a writing campaign against milk cartons and plastic straws being sent to their school – as a result they now receive glass bottles.

Sixpenny Handley First School looked at the impact of plastic on the coast and created a very large sea creature – so large it had to be displayed outside in a tent.

And the youngsters at Three Legged Cross First and Nursery School made creatures and sculptures using recycled materials to support their science learning and topic on Egyptians.

Pupils put their art into helping the environment

Heath Academy Trust schools displayed their Big Art Project made from recycled materials at Chalbury and Horton Village Hall. St James, Three Legged Cross, St Ives, St Mary’s, Sixpenny Handley and Oakhyrst First Schools contributed to the display.

Justine Horn added: “Although the schools had their own focus they were all working to the same goal – to inspire our children to help transform the world for the better.”

 

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